Consent to let solution for a self-employed expat

Our solutions

1ST AUG 2022

Consent to let solution for a self-employed expat

 

We have a range of mortgage solutions for expat clients, that also cater for foreign nationals, seafarers and clients paid in foreign and/or multiple currencies.

We lend from £200k to £5m and currently have expat deals available for loans over £500k. Rates start from 2.24%. You can find out more on our expat solutions page. To check the countries we consider, please view our countries list.

The clients’ scenario

In this case example, the US-based clients were looking for an interest only remortgage on a consent to let basis. The clients, including one self-employed applicant, were letting out their London property with a view to moving into the house in the longer term.

Our solution

We were able to offer a larger loan expat deal, taking into consideration self-employed income and earnings paid in US dollars.

This solution reflected all of the clients’ requirements:

– Interest only
– Ability to let the property via AirBnB
– Larger loan deal over £500k

Flexible products and efficient processing

Reflecting on this case, Specialist Lending Manager Dan said “The flexibility of our products allow us to take into account multiple factors and consider the clients’ scenario as a whole to provide the right mortgage solution for their needs.

Our online documentation and signature process also offers a smooth and speedy way of sharing case information, particularly for those living abroad.”

Hear from the intermediary 

Micah Cowan of Optimum Mortgages commented, “Very helpful. I initially spoke with Dan about a quirky expat case I was struggling to place due to the loan amount. Dan was more than happy to help and check with lending managers if there was any chance of it going ahead.”

 

To find out more about our expat solutions, please call your Specialist Lending Manager. They are happy to chat through individual cases.

This is a recent case example, pricing is tailored to your clients’ individual circumstances. Article details are correct as at 29 July 2022.